How to Get on Birth Control? | roxana_ac

How to Get on Birth Control?

Thirty years ago, the population on earth reached five billion. This is why every July 11th World Population Day is celebrated, established in 1988 by the United Nations Development Program. This day is commemorated with the intention of becoming aware of the population's growth and the measures being implemented in relation to the subject.

In the world, there are several methods to control birth in developed and underdeveloped countries, although in some cases, other factors such as religious beliefs, economic factors, and life habits influence, which prevent the adoption of these mechanisms. According to the 2010 State of the Population Report carried out by the United Nations Population Fund, in the last decade the use of contraceptives has increased and Adolescent birth rates have decreased. Still, universal access to reproductive health control services is not achieved.

In Malawi in 2013, the investment in birth control increased, reaching 60% of the population. Rwanda and Ethiopia have also expanded the resources allocated to this issue and encouraged other countries of the continent, through several congresses, to adopt measures in relation to family planning. In the United States, a law was created that requires workplaces to offer medical insurance to their employees that cover contraceptive methods free of charge. These, in addition to birth control pills, include:

  • The contraceptive patch
  • Vaginal ring
  • Depo-Provera
  • Sub-dermal
  • Implants Intrauterine device
This measure caused a stir by religious organizations such as the Catholic Church as they condemn the measure and speak out against abortion and the use of this type of method. They also claim that the government does not have the right to force religious institutions to go against their beliefs.

In many countries, the most common contraceptive methods are intrauterine devices followed by birth control pills and condoms. Less commonly used are sub-dermal implants, injectables, the vaginal ring, and lastly, patches. There is now more information about the options available to the population to protect themselves.

All of these have side effects that depend mainly on the patient and his organism. Slight weight gain, changes in menstrual cycles, increased colic, and even allergies are some of the most common reactions. Doctors say that young people have the right to access these methods.

The 2013 State of the Population Report revealed that around 20,000 adolescents have a child every day, 70,000 die every year from pregnancy complications, and there are 3.2 million unsafe abortions among adolescents each year. According to the United Nations Population Fund, the use of contraceptive methods could prevent 100 million unwanted pregnancies by 2028.

All about contraceptive/birth control methods

Access to contraceptive methods is a right. We all have the right to decide whether or not to have children, the number, and the spacing between them. Advised by a specialist, each person can decide on the appropriate birth control according to their habits, their body, and their plans. If used correctly, these methods provide high efficiency.

That is to say that for a person who uses any of these birth controls correctly, the chances of getting pregnant are almost nil. Of all these methods, only the condom prevents unplanned pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections at the same time. To start using a contraceptive method, it is necessary to first consult a doctor, consult a professional and choose the right one for each person. The consultation can be carried out free of charge in the public system (hospitals and health centers depending on the country) or in the private system for those who have medical coverage.

Let’s see the most used birth control methods:


Male condoms

  • Known as: Lining, prophylactic, condom, preservative.
  • Description: It is a latex sheath that is placed on the erect penis during each sexual intercourse and prevents semen from entering the vagina.
  • How to use: It is placed when the penis is erect, and the condom’s tip is squeezed and unrolled to the base of the penis. It is withdrawn after ejaculation before the penis loses its erection.
  • Benefits: It is easy to get and does not affect the body. It is the only method that prevents sexually transmitted infections. It can be used during pregnancy and lactation. You do not need a prescription.
  • Considerations: Since it is placed during sexual intercourse it can interrupt foreplay, so it is recommended to include it in it. All participants in the sexual relationship must participate and insist on its use.
  • Efficacy: High, if used correctly and throughout sexual intercourse.
  • Frequency of use: In each sexual relationship from the beginning to the end.
  • Myths: It is not true that if I did not ejaculate, I can use it again. It is not true that using two condoms at the same time increases their effectiveness. It is not true that if I ejaculate outside I don't need to use it. It is not true that it decreases sensitivity. It is not true that its use is the sole responsibility of the male.
  • Reversible effect: If not used, it is possible to get pregnant.
  • Prevents STIs: Yes, it prevents HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.
  • Free: Yes. In many countries, you can consult the distribution centers.
(Sorry if the description has been very "graphic" but it is good information for young people and teenagers)



Vaginal ring

  • Known as: Ring.
  • Description: It is a flexible ring that is placed inside the vagina and prevents ovulation through the continuous release of hormones.
  • How to use: It is placed inside the vagina similar to a tampon. You must press the ring into the vagina and release it so that it is placed.
  • Benefits: Its effect lasts 3 weeks. It should then be removed and a new one inserted after menstruation. Does not interfere with sexual intercourse.
  • Considerations: It can cause pain, irritation, increased vaginal secretion, epithelial lesions, and discomfort during intercourse, expulsion.
  • Efficiency: High.
  • Frequency of use: A ring is placed once a month.
  • Myths: It is not true that it can get stuck in the vagina or migrate to other parts of the body. It is not true that it can come off during physical activity.
  • Reversible effect: It is reversible at the time of removing the ring.
  • Prevents STIs: It does not prevent sexually transmitted infections.
  • Free: No. It is available in pharmacies.


Birth control pills

  • Known as: Birth control pills, and contraceptive pills.
  • Description: They are daily pills made from hormones that prevent ovulation. There are options of 21 or 28 tablets.
  • How to use: You have to take one pill every day at the same time, for 21 or 28 days. To start using this method, prior consultation with a doctor must be made and he or she will indicate which one is appropriate for each woman.
  • Benefits: In addition to avoiding pregnancy, they prevent some types of cancer, reduce symptoms related to the menstrual cycle, and can regulate it.
  • Considerations: It is necessary to maintain a routine to take one tablet every day at the same time. Interrupting taking or forgetting tablets decreases the effectiveness.
  • Efficacy: It is a highly effective method if taken correctly.
  • Frequency of use: Every day.
  • Myths: It is not true that you should take a break after a certain time. It is not true that they cause weight gain. It is not true that after the age of 35 they should not be taken. It is not true that it decreases sexual desire.
  • Reversible effect: A woman can get pregnant almost immediately after stopping taking the pills. There is no increase in fertility when the intake is stopped.
  • STI Prevention: Does not prevent sexually transmitted infections.
  • Free: Available in the public health system of many countries.


Injectable contraception

  • Known as: Injection.
  • Description: These are doses of injectable hormones that inhibit ovulation.
  • How to use: A deep intramuscular injection is applied once a month or quarterly, always on the same date.
  • Benefits: It has the same effect as the pills, but it is applied monthly or quarterly.
  • Considerations: It is important to respect the date of the new injection. Otherwise, it loses effectiveness. At the start of the method, menses may be irregular or prolonged. With the continuation of the method, menstrual bleeding may decrease or be absent.
  • Efficiency: High, as long as its application is made on the correct date.
  • Frequency of use: Once a month or every three months.
  • Myths: It is not true that the application of the injection is always painful. It is not true that the contraceptive injection can render a woman sterile. It is not true that after a certain time of applying the injections the organism should be allowed to rest. It is not true that it can cause cancer.
  • Reversible effect: After stopping its use, fertility recovers immediately.
  • Prevents STIs: Does not prevent sexually transmitted infections.
  • Free: Available free of charge in the public medical system of many countries.


Sub-dermic implant

  • Known as: Chip.
  • Description: It is a flexible plastic implant the size of a matchstick. It releases hormones that prevent ovulation.
  • How to use: It is inserted under the skin of the arm through a small incision using a local anesthetic. The placement is done by a health professional.
  • Benefits: Its effect lasts from 3 to 7 years. The effectiveness does not depend on maintaining a habit on the part of the woman. It is checked only once or twice a year.
  • Considerations: It is for any person with the ability to gestate who has or has not had an obstetric event (delivery, cesarean section, abortion).
  • Efficiency: High. Frequency of use: It must be exchanged for another implant after 3 years of placement. No need to take a break.
  • Myths: It is not true that the application is painful. It is not true that it causes weight gain.
  • Reversible effect: Fertility is recovered at the time of removal.
  • Prevents STIs: Does not prevent sexually transmitted infections.
  • Free: Available free of charge in the public medical system of many countries.


Intrauterine device

  • Known as: IUD
  • Description: It is a small piece of plastic with copper that prevents fertilization.
  • How to use: It is placed inside the uterus by a professional in a gynecological office.
  • Benefits: Its effect lasts between 3 and 10 years. The effectiveness does not depend on maintaining a habit on the part of the woman. Avoid the difficulties that other methods may present, due to forgetfulness or mistakes. You only have to check it once or twice a year. It can be used by all women, of all ages, whether or not they have had children.
  • Considerations: May increase bleeding during menstruation. It must be placed and removed by a doctor.
  • Efficiency: High.
  • Frequency of use: It must be changed for another device after 3-10 years of placement. No need to take a break.
  • Myths: It is not true that it is less effective than oral contraceptives. It is not true that it is abortive. It is not true that it can perforate the uterus or migrate to other organs in the body.
  • Reversible effect: Fertility is restored immediately after removal and can be removed at any time.
  • Prevents STIs: Does not prevent sexually transmitted infections.
  • Free: Available free of charge in the public medical system of many countries.


Female condoms

  • Known as: Female condom.
  • Description: It is a polyurethane sheath with a ring at each end, one of which is closed.
  • How to use: At each sexual intercourse, it is inserted inside the vagina, leaving the closed ring in contact with the entrance of the uterus. To remove, gently twist the outer ring and pull the condom out of the vagina. Throw the female condom in the trash after using it once. Do not reuse it.
  • Benefits: Provides autonomy to women and is an alternative to the male condom. Protects from sexually transmitted infections. It does not interrupt sexual intercourse because it can be placed previously. It is not latex so it can be used with any type of lubricant.
  • Considerations: They are not yet available in some countries.
  • Efficiency: High.
  • Frequency of use: In each sexual relationship.
  • Myths: It is not true that it decreases sexual pleasure. It is not true that it is difficult to remove it.
  • Reversible effect: It is reversible when you stop using them.
  • Prevents STIs: Yes, but only during vaginal sex.
  • Free: No, it is not free. Consult with your gynecologist.

Irreversible birth control

  1. Vasectomy
  • Known as: Vasectomy or male sterilization.
  • Description: It is a permanent, safe, and simple surgical method.
  • How it works: It consists of tying the vas deferens in order to prevent the passage of sperm from the testicles to the penis. It can be done with local anesthesia and without hospitalization.
  • Benefits: Does not require general anesthesia. It does not modify the physical appearance of the male sexual organs. It has no side effects. It does not affect sexual desire or activity.
  • Considerations: It is effective three months after being performed. In that period, another method of contraception should be used.
  • Efficacy: High, after three months of having been carried out.
  • Frequency of use: The intervention is for a single time.
  • Myths: It is not true that it affects a man's sexual desire. It is not true that it affects the erection. It is not true that it changes the appearance of the genitals.
  • Reversible effect: In general it is irreversible. The reversal is through a difficult and expensive surgery, not available in the public health system.
  • Prevents STIs: Does not prevent sexually transmitted infections.
  • Free: This procedure is free in many countries.


2. Tubal ligation

  • Known as: Tubal ligation or female sterilization.
  • Description: It is a permanent surgical method for women.
  • How it is used: It consists of tying, cutting, or obstructing the fallopian tubes so that the ovules cannot be in contact with the sperm. The surgery is simple. It is performed by a professional in an operating room and requires total or epidural anesthesia.
  • Benefits: There is no medical condition that restricts the possibility of choosing this method, although some conditions or circumstances require certain precautions. It has no long-term side effects.
  • Considerations: In some health services, it is requested to have children, the consent of the parents in case of being a minor, or judicial authorization before the procedure.
  • Efficiency: High.
  • Frequency of use: The intervention is for a single time.
  • Myths: It is not true that it affects the menstrual cycle. It is not true that it affects mood. It is not true that it produces changes in the woman's body.
  • Reversible effect: It is a permanent contraceptive method for women. The reversal is through a difficult, expensive, and unavailable surgery in the public health system.
  • Prevents STIs: Does not prevent sexually transmitted infections.
  • This procedure is free in many countries.
As you can see, nowadays having birth control is possible thanks to different contraceptive methods. There are many others that I have not mentioned here such as combined oral contraceptives, exclusive contraceptives for breastfeeding, emergency hormonal contraception, intrauterine delivery system, and the patch.


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