My history as a bookworm


As a child, I regularly struggled with attacks of asthmatic bronchitis, which prevented me from going to school and had to keep the bed panting.

In a time without internet or day television, there was only one activity left that I could deal with: reading, reading a lot.

I had a large collection of comic books, but fortunately I also had a lot of 'regular' reading books. I read all sorts of things, reading distracted me from the fight for air my lungs wished to keep busy. Maybe that's where my career as a bookworm started.

Between sick days I joined the library regularly for a new stock of books. Ever even twice in a day. The library lady couldn't believe I had all the books from that morning in the afternoon, and sent me away again.

I can get even mad about it...


(c) 2021 Hans van Gemert

- entirely to truth-

This contribution fits into the #140w - #writingchallenge from April 2020. Read more about it here:


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Necrolord
Master of the dark arts, using necrotic forbidden magic to raise the dead. On the opposite spectrum of Holy magic necromancy and blood magic is frowned upon by any magic wielder. Mostly practiced in remote places where it is not seen, this almost uncontrollable school of magic is unpredictable and can bring things back to life which is better left dead. Bending the will of the dead to create armies to fight for you and inflict deadly diseases upon others. This necromancer has mastered it’s art and has even become undead himself. #drawings
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Missiles: The Cost of an Exploding Education
The recent escalation of the conflict between Israel and Palestine brought with it the traces of the pain of death and destruction caused by missile attacks on both sides.I do not want to delve into the ethnic or cultural origins of the conflict itself, but at a cost that, for me, is ignored. I mean the expense it represents.On the Palestinian side with Hamas, we are talking about two thousand rockets fired at an average of $ 400 each, yielding a figure of $ 800,000 (about 658,589 euros).While those fired by Israel from its Iron Dome system cost $ 50,000 each; So, if we place the same proportion, that is, 2 thousand rockets, it gives us $ 100,000,000 or about 82,323,700 euros.These € 82,982,289 are the equivalent of the cost of the most expensive university tuition in the Netherlands for about 5,533 students per year.But in Venezuela, where private university education lags far behind those costs, the number would skyrocket to benefit more than 50,400 students.The world needs - to be civilized - less weapons and more books.#education  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Misiles: El costo de una educación que estalla La reciente escalada del conflicto entre Israel y Palestina trajo consigo las huellas del dolor por la muerte y la destrucción que causan los ataques de ambos bandos mediante los misiles. No me quiero adentrar en los orígenes étnicos o culturales del conflicto mismo, sino en un costo que, para mí, es ignorado. Me refiero al del gasto que representa. Del lado palestino con Hamas, hablamos de dos mil cohetes disparados a una media de $400 cada uno, arroja una cifra de $800.000 (unos 658.589 euros). En tanto que los disparados por Israel desde su sistema Cúpula de hierro tiene un costo de $50.000 cada uno; así que, si colocamos la misma proporción, es decir, 2 mil cohetes, nos da $100.000.000 o unos 82.323.700 de euros. Estos 82.982.289 de euros son el equivalente al costo de la matrícula universitaria más costosa en los Países Bajos de unos 5.533 estudiantes al año. Pero en Venezuela, donde la educación universitaria privada está muy por dejado de esos costos, la cifra se dispararía para beneficiar a más de 50.400 alumnos. El mundo necesita -para ser civilizado- menos armas y más libros.



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