What To Watch Chicago Fire On | sameerbedar07

What To Watch Chicago Fire On

What to Watch Chicago fire on


If you thought it was difficult keeping up with three to four Marvel movies every year, show some respect for those who have given their free time over to "One Chicago." The franchise consists of four TV series — "Chicago Fire," "Chicago P.D.," "Chicago Med," and "Chicago Justice" — about the men and women who seek to make the city a safer, brighter place. While the shows can absolutely exist on their own, they tend to crossover with one another, and viewers who regularly tune in for all of them get the most out of the interconnected universe.

"Chicago Fire" is the most in-depth undertaking if you're looking for a new binge-watch. The show's currently on its tenth season, so you have quite a bit in front of you if you want a full rewatch or wish to begin the series from the beginning. Luckily, you have some simple options for gaining access to every episode of "Chicago Fire."

One of the longest-running live-action scripted primetime series on American television — a feat surpassed only by the classic Western drama "Gunsmoke" and "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit" (SVU), the most successful of its many spin-off series — producer/creator Dick Wolf's Emmy-winning "Law & Order" aired for 20 seasons on NBC between 1990 and 2010. During that period, a virtual army of actors have handled both the enforcement and prosecutorial sides of its stories.

Chief among them were Sam Waterston, who starred as District Attorney (DA) Jack McCoy from Seasons 5 through 20; S. Epatha Merkerson as Lieutenant Anita Van Buren (Seasons 5-20); Chris Noth, who played Detective Mike Logan from Seasons 1 to 5; Jerry Orbach as the inimitable Det. Lennie Briscoe (Seasons 3-14); and Jesse L. Martin as Det. Ed Green (Seasons 10-18).

Dozens of other actors logged hours at the New York Police Department's 27th Homicide Precinct and New York County's District Attorney's Office over the course of the show's lengthy and popular network run. Many remain active in features and on television, while others have passed away in recent years. In honor of all the times their stories thrilled, chilled and otherwise captivated us, here's a list of the notable "Law & Order" cast members and recurring players who have passed away.


Did you know you can watch every episode in all of the "One Chicago" franchise by signing up for free with Peacock? You don't have to pay a single cent, and you get access to all "Chicago Fire" episodes right at your fingertips. You just have to subscribe to Peacock and stick with the free tier. However, it's worth noting that you will have to watch ads at that level. Anyone wishing to do away with commercials will need to spend some dough and sign up at the Premium Plus tier. Not only does it give you access to a ton more properties, but you also don't have any ads getting in the way.

If, for whatever reason, you're averse to getting Peacock, every episode of "Chicago Fire" is also available for purchase on YouTube. Each episode runs for $1.99, or you can buy an entire season in standard definition for $34.99. Another purchase option is to get physical copies. That means you always have "Chicago Fire" handy without worrying which streaming service it's on. A box set consisting of Seasons 1 through 8 is available for just under $150 on Amazon.

For our money, Peacock is the way to go. The free tier gives you access to a ton of other movies and TV shows, as well, so don't sleep on the platform.

Broadway vet Jerry Orbach was Det. Lenny Briscoe


Arguably one of the most popular characters in the "Law & Order” network run, cagey Detective Lennie Briscoe brought actor Jerry Orbach to national attention after a long and award-winning run on the Broadway stage and as a character actor in films and television. Orbach had been an original cast member in "The Fantasticks," the world's longest-running musical, and netted a Tony nomination as Billy Flynn in the original production of "Chicago"; his film roles included iconic work as Jennifer Grey's father in "Dirty Dancing" and the voice of Lumiere in Disney's animated "Beauty and the Beast."

Despite those laurels, Orbach's turn as Briscoe, which began with Season 3's "Point of View" in 1992, remained one of his most widely seen and well-regarded mainstream showcases. Orbach's streetwise performance netted an Emmy nomination and nine Screen Actors Guild nods for ensemble.

He was diagnosed with prostate cancer two years into his stint on the show, but remained in treatment for the next decade until retiring from the series in Season 14 in 2004, which made him one of the longest-running actors in its two-decade history. After reprising Briscoe for two episodes of the short-lived "Law & Order" spin-off "Trial By Jury," Orbach died at the age of 69 on December 28, 2004. Briscoe was named 15th in a 2007 TV Guide list of the 25 greatest TV detectives.

Reluctant TV star Steven Hill played DA Adam Schiff



An original "Law & Order" cast member, Steven Hill played the steely but philosophical New York Count District Attorney Adam Schiff from its debut episode, "Prescription for Death," in 1990 (replacing Roy Thinnes, who played DA Alfred Wentworth in the pilot, "Everybody's Favorite Bagman") until season 10's "Vaya Con Dios" a decade later.

The show wasn't Hill's first bout with TV stardom: active in live production during the "Golden Age of Television" in the 1950s, he played Dan Briggs, leader of the Impossible Missions Force, on the first season of the original TV version of "Mission: Impossible" from 1966 to 1967. He departed the series for unspecified reasons — "Variety" noted that Hill's religion (Orthodox Judaism) reportedly put him in conflict with shooting schedules due to observation of the Sabbath on Friday evenings — and remained off-screen for much of the 1970s. Appearances in '80s features like "Raw Deal" preceded his return to the spotlight on "L&O."

Hill retired from both the series and acting in 2000 with two Emmy nominations and seven Screen Actors Guild nods to his name. He died at the age of 94 on August 23, 2016 in Monsey, New York.



Here's Where You Can Stream Every Season Of Chicago Fire For Free

NBC

BY MIKE BEDARD/OCT. 14, 2021 7:05 PM EST

If you thought it was difficult keeping up with three to four Marvel movies every year, show some respect for those who have given their free time over to "One Chicago." The franchise consists of four TV series — "Chicago Fire," "Chicago P.D.," "Chicago Med," and "Chicago Justice" — about the men and women who seek to make the city a safer, brighter place. While the shows can absolutely exist on their own, they tend to crossover with one another, and viewers who regularly tune in for all of them get the most out of the interconnected universe.



These Child Actors Have Turned To Very Adult Careers


"Chicago Fire" is the most in-depth undertaking if you're looking for a new binge-watch. The show's currently on its tenth season, so you have quite a bit in front of you if you want a full rewatch or wish to begin the series from the beginning. Luckily, you have some simple options for gaining access to every episode of "Chicago Fire."

Peacock has all of Chicago Fire for free

NBC via YouTube

Did you know you can watch every episode in all of the "One Chicago" franchise by signing up for free with Peacock? You don't have to pay a single cent, and you get access to all "Chicago Fire" episodes right at your fingertips. You just have to subscribe to Peacock and stick with the free tier. However, it's worth noting that you will have to watch ads at that level. Anyone wishing to do away with commercials will need to spend some dough and sign up at the Premium Plus tier. Not only does it give you access to a ton more properties, but you also don't have any ads getting in the way.


If, for whatever reason, you're averse to getting Peacock, every episode of "Chicago Fire" is also available for purchase on YouTube. Each episode runs for $1.99, or you can buy an entire season in standard definition for $34.99. Another purchase option is to get physical copies. That means you always have "Chicago Fire" handy without worrying which streaming service it's on. A box set consisting of Seasons 1 through 8 is available for just under $150 on Amazon.

For our money, Peacock is the way to go. The free tier gives you access to a ton of other movies and TV shows, as well, so don't sleep on the platform.

These Child Actors Have Turned To Very Adult Careers

Love Scenes That Went Too Far

The Tragedy Of Mark Ruffalo Just Gets Sadder And Sadder


One of the longest-running live-action scripted primetime series on American television — a feat surpassed only by the classic Western drama "Gunsmoke" and "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit" (SVU), the most successful of its many spin-off series — producer/creator Dick Wolf's Emmy-winning "Law & Order" aired for 20 seasons on NBC between 1990 and 2010. During that period, a virtual army of actors have handled both the enforcement and prosecutorial sides of its stories.

Chief among them were Sam Waterston, who starred as District Attorney (DA) Jack McCoy from Seasons 5 through 20; S. Epatha Merkerson as Lieutenant Anita Van Buren (Seasons 5-20); Chris Noth, who played Detective Mike Logan from Seasons 1 to 5; Jerry Orbach as the inimitable Det. Lennie Briscoe (Seasons 3-14); and Jesse L. Martin as Det. Ed Green (Seasons 10-18).

Dozens of other actors logged hours at the New York Police Department's 27th Homicide Precinct and New York County's District Attorney's Office over the course of the show's lengthy and popular network run. Many remain active in features and on television, while others have passed away in recent years. In honor of all the times their stories thrilled, chilled and otherwise captivated us, here's a list of the notable "Law & Order" cast members and recurring players who have passed away.


Broadway vet Jerry Orbach was Det. Lenny Briscoe
Jessica Burstein/NBCU Photo Bank

Arguably one of the most popular characters in the "Law & Order” network run, cagey Detective Lennie Briscoe brought actor Jerry Orbach to national attention after a long and award-winning run on the Broadway stage and as a character actor in films and television. Orbach had been an original cast member in "The Fantasticks," the world's longest-running musical, and netted a Tony nomination as Billy Flynn in the original production of "Chicago"; his film roles included iconic work as Jennifer Grey's father in "Dirty Dancing" and the voice of Lumiere in Disney's animated "Beauty and the Beast."


Despite those laurels, Orbach's turn as Briscoe, which began with Season 3's "Point of View" in 1992, remained one of his most widely seen and well-regarded mainstream showcases. Orbach's streetwise performance netted an Emmy nomination and nine Screen Actors Guild nods for ensemble.

He was diagnosed with prostate cancer two years into his stint on the show, but remained in treatment for the next decade until retiring from the series in Season 14 in 2004, which made him one of the longest-running actors in its two-decade history. After reprising Briscoe for two episodes of the short-lived "Law & Order" spin-off "Trial By Jury," Orbach died at the age of 69 on December 28, 2004. Briscoe was named 15th in a 2007 TV Guide list of the 25 greatest TV detectives.


Reluctant TV star Steven Hill played DA Adam Schiff
NBC

An original "Law & Order" cast member, Steven Hill played the steely but philosophical New York Count District Attorney Adam Schiff from its debut episode, "Prescription for Death," in 1990 (replacing Roy Thinnes, who played DA Alfred Wentworth in the pilot, "Everybody's Favorite Bagman") until season 10's "Vaya Con Dios" a decade later.

The show wasn't Hill's first bout with TV stardom: active in live production during the "Golden Age of Television" in the 1950s, he played Dan Briggs, leader of the Impossible Missions Force, on the first season of the original TV version of "Mission: Impossible" from 1966 to 1967. He departed the series for unspecified reasons — "Variety" noted that Hill's religion (Orthodox Judaism) reportedly put him in conflict with shooting schedules due to observation of the Sabbath on Friday evenings — and remained off-screen for much of the 1970s. Appearances in '80s features like "Raw Deal" preceded his return to the spotlight on "L&O."

Hill retired from both the series and acting in 2000 with two Emmy nominations and seven Screen Actors Guild nods to his name. He died at the age of 94 on August 23, 2016 in Monsey, New York.

Fred Dalton Thompson: from Senator to DA Arthur Branch



Prior to joining the cast of "Law & Order" as District Attorney Arthur Branch on Season 13's "American Jihad," Fred Dalton Thompson had one of the most unique careers of any working actor in Hollywood.

A former U.S. attorney and minority counsel for the Senate Watergate Committee in the 1970s, Thompson was a two-term Tennessee senator from 1994 to 2003, and even ran for president in 2007. His acting career began in 1985 when director Roger Donaldson asked him to play himself in the film "Marie," about a corruption case against Tennessee's governor that Thompson had assisted. He parlayed the performance into steady work as authority figures in films like "The Hunt for Red October," "Cape Fear," "Sinister and perhaps most memorably, "Die Hard 2."

Thompson joined "Law and Order" during his final term as a senator, and played Branch for five seasons before departing in 2007 to oversee his presidential bid. He also played Branch on four other "Law and Order" series, including 11 episodes of "SVU" and 13 episodes of "Trial By Jury," for which he served as a series regular while also starring on "Law & Order." Diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in 2004, Thompson died after a recurrence of the disease at the age of 73 on November 1, 2015.

Dennis Farina was a cop in real life and on TV


Character actor Dennis Farina lent authentic law enforcement flavor to his two-year run as the larger-than-life Detective Joe Fontana on "Law and Order."

Like his character, Farina had been a former member of the Chicago Police Department and served as a consultant to writer-director Michael Mann, who cast him as the lead in his cult TV series "Crime Story" before segueing into acting roles in films like "Midnight Run," "Saving Private Ryan," and "Get Shorty." Farina stepped into big shoes when he joined the series in Season 15's "Paradigm": Jerry Orbach had just left the drama, which needed a lead detective to partner with detectives Ed Green (Jesse L. Martin) and Nick Falco (Michael Imperioli).

Farina left the series at the end of Season 16 to pursue other projects. These included stints as host of "Unsolved Mysteries" and a recurring role on "New Girl," as well as features like "What Happens in Vegas." Farina died from a pulmonary embolism at the age of 69 in Scottsdale, Arizona on July 22, 2013.

Lynn Cohen brought the order as Judge Mizener



Best known to television audiences as Magda, Miranda's stern housekeeper/nanny on "Sex and the City," Lynn Cohen was a versatile character actor whose career included numerous Broadway productions and appearances in Steven Spielberg's "Munich" (as Golda Meir) and as Mags Flanagan, the oldest Hunger Games competitor, in "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire."

Between these roles, Cohen enjoyed a recurring role on "Law and Order" as Manhattan Judge Elizabeth Mizener. The character made her debut on the series in Season 4's "Profile," and returned 11 more times, most notably as the presiding judge in Executive ADA McCoy's attempt to bring down the people who killed ADA Alexandra Borgia (Annie Parisse) in Season 16's "Invaders."

In addition to her "Law and Order" stints, Cohen also logged two episodes apiece on both "SVU" and "Criminal Intent." She continued working in features and on television until February 14, 2020, when she died in New York City at the age of 86.

Doris Belack, the "Law & Order" judge to fear


Prosecutors on "Law & Order" probably trembled a bit upon discovering that Trial and Arraignment Judge Margaret Barry was presiding over their case.

Barry, a New York Supreme Court judge in 10 episodes, as well as two cases on "SVU," all between 1990 and 2001, demanded rock-solid evidence from the prosecution. In Season 11's "School Daze," she threw a wrench into McCoy's case against an alleged school shooter by granting the defense — Carey Lowell's Jamie Ross — the right to suppress key evidence, including an alleged murder weapon.

Judge Barry was played by Doris Belack, a respected actress on the New York stage and television, and a memorable comic presence in feature films like "Tootsie" and "What About Bob?" and even video games like "Grand Theft Auto IV." The latter proved to be the final acting credit in her long career: Belack died of natural causes at the age of 85 in New York City on October, 4, 2011.

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