Sounds of Bamboo winter concerts


Sounds of bamboo #winterconcerten in Dranouter and Kruiseke-Wervik. On Friday 27 and Saturday 28 November Sounds of bambooorganizes a number of winter concerts during which we will #panfluit put the focus again.

After the successful first concert in March in Rekkem we will play this time in the H. Hart church in Kruiseke.

Given the Covid-19 restrictions, we provide an afternoon performance at 15.30h and an evening performance at 20.00h.

The evening before, on 27 November at 20.30h we will also perform in the St-Jan de Doperkerk in Dranouter, this concert in collaboration with Muziekcentrum Dranouter.

winterconcerten
winterconcerten

On the programme:

Project 4: Henske Bakker, Carina Bossenbroek, Nadja Spooren and Marlies de Roos-Linden from the Netherlands, bring an atmospheric and cheerful programme. With both traditional songs, popular and old music they let us reflect on the almost past year, musing about the beautiful things that will come and persuade people to sing along a familiar tune. Besides the panflute and their voice they will also have some acoustic instruments from the Balkans.

In March we opened the concert with the very young Luca Radutataru from Moldova who, with his Romanian recorder, immediately managed to move and fascinate the audience, he too will be back. As well as Stefan Negura, pan flute phenomenon from Moldova. Raluca Patuleanu will also be there, a Romanian who has lived in Belgium for 30 years. She teaches panflute lessons and a pupil of her young Ionut Anthony will also take his first steps on stage at these concerts. Many are looking forward to seeing them back at work!

winterconcerten
winterconcerten

Tom Goemaere will complete the whole with the warm sounds of the bass flute.

“My passion for the instrument eventually led my wife Annick Raes to start Sounds of Bamboo.” According to Tom Goemaere. Around the church in Dranouter and on the playground of the adjacent school in Kruiseke we also provide some positions with Romanian specialities, cd -sales and some items from the Sounds of bambooshop. Be there, discover and enjoy culture in its purest form, a unique acoustic event

The organisation Sounds of bamboois committed to keeping these events corona safe. (walking direction, social distance, hand and disinfection gel...) Mouth caps are mandatory! Keep it safe, so we can make it two unforgettable days together!

Gebo, the dynamic reciprocity
Gebo: it is a rune sign, or a letter. But it's also a word. A word related to “give”, but also to a lesser extent with words for “movement”, think “go”. The word refers to reciprocity, but just different from the well-known “what you do not want you to be done” line of thought. Here is an explanation of the valuable principle behind the concept of Gebo. And what happens when it's forgotten. Principe - Gebo represents the essential principle of reciprocity, of balance. Any relationship, regardless of whether it is with a human, animal or Deity, has an underlying transaction, an exchange of energy. This energy can be represented in money, time, material goods, attention, recognition, wisdom or any other matter, physical or not. In some relationships, this is clearly acknowledged and agreed, as in the case of an employment contract. One party gives energy in the form of time, attention, actions and certain responsibilities. And the other party gives energy in the form of recognized currency. But in other relationships it is less framed, less demarcated. For example, in relations between man and (house) animal, between man and man, and between man and Deity. In a healthy relationship there is a certain balance in terms of energy. How this balance looks, of course, differs enormously, whether there is a right balance can only really be known by the parties directly involved. Very important to remember here is that different forms of energy per person can differ in value. For one, it is very valuable when you invite them to come by, for the other such an invitation feels more like a cost. To find out for yourself and for the other how these relationships work together is an important part of building a sustainable relationship. A component that will always remain in development. Man and (house) animal - People could not have built civilizations as we know them, without establishing relationships with other animals. Wolves/dogs that helped with hunting, cattle from which all kinds of valuable goods come, cats that hunt pests, all of them have been important in our march of “civilization”. But more than the other relationships mentioned here, the danger of imbalance is clear and visible worldwide in the relationship between humans and animals. The dog, once a valued and necessary partner. But the dog became increasingly dependent on man, and man independent of the dog. The dog lived and planted on to the whims of man, and could not bring anything against it. While man had more and more space for specialization and entertainment. The positions grew more and more unevenly, dogs that could never form packs, people who bred dogs based on fashion trends. And now there are “purebred dogs” whose brains don't fit inside their skull, dogs are raised to hyperaggressive fighters worldwide, and are thrown away elsewhere when they're not cute enough anymore. The dog has been devalued from living creature to utensils. And partly because of this, man has fallen from partner to, I can't say anything but monster and martyr. We pay in our empathic capacity, in our 'humanity'. (note, this is a simplified explanation for illustration and concerns humanity and rabies as general) For livestock money this problem much more. The relationship between the energy we put into our livestock is in no relation to what comes out. Animal feed is produced in huge quantities and feels less expensive for us (the environmental damage is not passed on unfortunately), the physical space per living creature has become much smaller, and production in meat, milk or eggs per animal has increased tremendously. But now we as (western) people have become dependent on this situation. In fact, we live on the pof. Building the 'cost' on. Global environmental damage, health problems, future pandemics. Gebo requires reckoning, not as punishment, but as a cause-effect. And interest rates are growing cumulatively. As a more positive example, the house cat (I focus here specifically on the fine part, problems around breed cats etc.. are like dogs a tearful reality). A house cat gets a safe home from birth to death, access to food and drink, attention and access to warm sunny spots. In return, they give us some release from mice, but above all something intangible and valuable. The presence of a living being? Entertainment? rest? I don't really have a good word for it.. But I think most of the better cat owners can agree that when the animal is away for a long time, there is a clear loss in the house. gods - Also in a relationship between man and Deity, such a balance is necessary. Only it is impossible for a man to comprehend what, how and who exactly is a Deity. Never expect anything from the Gods for nothing. But what gift or regift can reasonably be expected is inconvenient for an outsider to say. Both historical and modern, there is a variety of options to discover. A fraught term in this is “sacrifice”. Maar gods zijn geen fysieke wezens aan wie je iets makkelijk kan overhandigen. It takes some skill to make the difference between offering a sacrifice (physical or intangible) and simply throwing your gift into the void as pure waste. Start differently with undivided attention, as a kind of invitation or welcome gift. Call this prayer or meditation, the terminology is like the methodology for humans and no objective distinction. In the absence of a better word, “attention” seems to be widely appreciated. If the meditation/prayer is not directly for you, you can also give that attention in other ways. For example, by learning about the Deity in question, or by making or doing something that shows your appreciation for them. For example, a work of art or an article on the internet. Don't keep 'praying' if you feel like not receiving anything in return. Maar houd wel in je achterhoofd dat de gods geen mensen zijn. The simple feeling of being heard, or even more basic the feeling of having spoken can already be a regift. But perhaps when you learn to pay attention, you will notice that the influence of this Deity is gradually becoming more present in yourself and in your life. Maybe Freya teaches you to love and mourn, maybe Mijmer teaches you to be considered, maybe Wodan will teach you the ecstasy of anger, or Hoenir will teach you the power of silence. Or maybe the “gifts” come across as punishments. Help in discovering the necessary lessons and confrontations in your life for example. Unless you are lucky enough to employ a very devoted and gifted priest, you will have to and may experience this for yourself. And also discover the balance yourself. In this you may make mistakes, but those mistakes will never be without consequence. Do not forget the great wisdom of the Havamal: “Every gift requires a regift.” Gratitude and appreciation can already be good regivers, as long as it is truly sincere. And sincere appreciation you show again not only with a “thank you”. #Heidenisme #paganism #rune #spirituality #philosophy #bore #reciprocity #religie
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The Other Side of Emigrating to the United States
#journalism Newspaper article. Topic: Emigration of Venezuelans. Author: Darimel Urdaneta (MeredithSkywalker) The other side of immigrating to the United States There are many reasons why a Venezuelan decides to emigrate, but they all conclude that in Venezuela there is no future or quality of life, that is why many decide to leave to different parts of Latin America, but in recent months there has been a boom of migrating to the land of opportunities such as the United States of America. Learn the story of Irma, an 80-year-old lady who, with the help of another Venezuelan, managed to cross the river de grande from Mexico to the United States. Irma is a native of Maracaibo Venezuela, and at 80 years old she managed to cross the border with the United States. Irma had fainted while trying to cross the river and another Venezuelan helped her cross and arrived safely to the mainland. The humanitarian crisis that Venezuela is going through has forced Venezuelans to escape from the need that is currently experiencing in Venezuela. Some states in the country suffer from electrical fluctuations, such as total loss of electricity by hours or even days. There are no medicines, medical care is precarious. No public transport, no food on the shelves and where a Venezuelan can get food is at very high prices, since the minimum wage is $3 per month, and for a family of 4 people you need $350 for the basic food basket for one month. And besides all this is insecurity, there are guerrillas, criminal gangs and the most feared is the police themselves who harms Venezuelans, many Venezuelans have been persecuted politicians and that is why they flee Venezuela. At the OAS, David Smolansky warned that estimates the number of Venezuelans abroad will reach 7 million and recalled that the Venezuelan is leaving the country due to the crisis and the world “must welcome us”. According to France 24, Venezuelan citizens pay up to 12,000 dollars to coyotes to cross from Mexico to the US illegally. However, they highlight that the arrival of undocumented immigrants on US soil has broken records, and according to the Customs and Border Protection Office (CBP), in April they had recorded the highest figures in the last 20 years: more than 178,000 people arrived irregularly, in many cases putting their lives at risk. Just as there are stories with happy endings like that of Mrs. Irma, there are heartbreaking stories, as is the case of Ana N (her name is protected) a Venezuelan woman who crossed with her two children and her husband, they had paid a coyote to cross them along the river and the current was high by that date. In view of the fact that Ana's youngest son was crying, a crying coyote decided to throw the baby into the river, the people who witnessed this atrocious act could not do anything, as a coyote is part of Mexican cartels, however the father of the creature threw himself into the river to try to save his son but his effort was in vain since the baby had died. The question of emigrating is not only crossing the river, because when you cross into cells inside the United States shelter, you can spend days there without being able to communicate with your relatives, how can you also not bathe until a week passes. That's what Juan N told us (his name is protected), he told us about his journey from Maracaibo to the United States. “One morning they went to pick me up in Monterrey, the driver who was going to take me to Ciudad Acuña, passed with a caravan like 10 cars. From Monterrey to Ciudad Acuña they were about 6 hours. Among the drivers were communicating about the alcabala, and there are police officers who behaved hateful and the drivers were paying them. On a mandatory basis we all had to have a role where we were sealed in migration with permission to be in Mexico for 180 days. We arrived at Ciudad Acuña at about 6 in the afternoon, they left us in a house that had a large patio, and there they all agreed to order food while we were waiting there. The one who went to buy the food arrived at about 10 o'clock in the evening with pizza and other food there, so everyone ate and we waited for instructions. At 2 in the morning they woke us all up because it was time to cross to the United States. Everything looked like a movie, we went jogging and we got to a mountain, we had to cross 3 barbed fences, and it was a shame with the children, the older people, struggling with those wires to be able to cross, but among all of us we helped. Then we approached the river and that river reached me through my chest, I measure 1.78. the current was tight, but we all managed to cross. Then when we crossed we had to climb a steep one and there was mud and people were slipping but we still crossed it. After crossing we had to change our clothes for dry clothes, because if it was wet they wouldn't let you through. Then the patrol arrived and they gave us good morning and then they asked us why we passed so early, and they recommended that it was best to happen after 6 in the morning which is when the river is low, but they also welcomed us to the United States. We were 49 people, and he called more patrols because in one of us we didn't all get in. Then they took us to the river yield and checked everything, and if you got something wet they'd dumped it at you. In the review they tell how much money you arrive in cash, keep it in an envelope along with your passport and phone. From there you wait for processing, taking pictures and fingerprints. And you have to wait, a lot of people moved her to other places and no idea where they were taking them. And those who process there they open a file and they must wait for a transfer and tell you that you are on the list for the transfer. I spent 8 days in that stay, there are people who only had 3 days there as were people who had a month. The hardest thing is the wait, because you sleep on the floor, on a foami that is on the floor, your pillow was your shoes, at breakfast you ate a burrito, at lunch rice with beans, meat and at dinner you eat another burrito. You don't have a watch, you have to ask the officers about the time, the men were outdoors along with 100 mates or even more, and the women if they were inside but were less in group, they were like 20 or 30 women. Women are the same, they don't see the light of day either, only they lasted less time in the shelter. They only had officers sitting in their offices working in front of them. In my experience I could only bathe twice. They told me soap, shampoo, toothpaste, deodorant, new socks and new underwear in the two bathrooms I had. Being there is quite difficult because of the uncertainty but it's worth it, as the lifestyle you live in the United States is not achieved in another country, besides security.” That was the experience of one of the interviewees and from what you can see it is crude, but it is the reality that many Venezuelans and other immigrants of other nationalities come to live while on the journey and in the shelter. However, Venezuelans who arrive in the United States illegally seeking asylum, in addition to risking their lives, are exposed to being deported again to Venezuela, due to the condition in which they arrive, while others must hire lawyers while waiting in detention centers. Sources: NoticieroDigital.com Elpitazo.com Laprensadelara.com XXX